Asymmetric effects of graspable distractor disks on motor preparation of successive grasps: a behavioural and event-related potential (ERP) study

Uccelli, Stefano and Palumbo, Letizia and Harrison, Neil and Bruno, Nicola (2020) Asymmetric effects of graspable distractor disks on motor preparation of successive grasps: a behavioural and event-related potential (ERP) study. International Journal of Psychophysiology. ISSN 0167-8760 (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

There is evidence that seeing a graspable object automatically elicits a preparatory motor process. However, it is unclear whether this implicit visuomotor process might influence the preparation of a successive grasp for a different object. We addressed the issue by implementing a combined behavioural and electrophysiological paradigm. Participants performed pantomimed grasps directed to small or large disks with either a two (pincer) or a five-finger (pentapod) grip, after the presentation of congruent (same size) or incongruent (different size) distractor disks. Preview reaction times (PRTs) and response-locked lateralized readi-ness potentials (R-LRPs) were recorded as online indices of motor preparation. Results re-vealed asymmetric effects of the distractors on PRTs and R-LRPs. For pincer grip disks, in-congruent distractors were associated with longer PRTs and a delayed R-LRP peak. For pentapod grip disks, conversely, incongruent distractors were associated with shorter PRTs and a delayed R-LRP onset. Supporting an interpretation of these effects as tapping into motor preparation, we did not observe modulations of stimulus-locked LRP’s (sensitive to sensory processing), or of the P300 component (related to reallocating attentional resources). These results challenge models (i.e., the “dorsal amnesia” hypothesis) which assume that visuomotor information presented before a grasp will not affect how we later perform that grasp.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: perception, action, grasping, motor preparation, two-visual-systems hypothesis, lateralized readiness potentials.
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > Psychology
Depositing User: Letizia Palumbo
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2021 10:28
Last Modified: 07 Jan 2021 10:28
URI: https://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/3221

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