Collective Memory and the Legacy of the Troubles: Territoriality, Identity and Victimhood in Northern Ireland

Ferguson, Neil and Halliday, Donna (2020) Collective Memory and the Legacy of the Troubles: Territoriality, Identity and Victimhood in Northern Ireland. In: The Social Psychology of Collective Victimhood. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 56-74. ISBN 9780190875190

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Abstract

This chapter discusses the transmission of collective memories of victimization in Northern Ireland to generations that did not experience the violence personally. Victim narratives are transmitted not only by family members, but also through physical identity markers in the community such as murals, memorials, graffiti, painted curbstones, flags, and parades. Through this transmission, the youth perceive a duty to remember and feel that it is now their turn to fight. The chapter discusses the role of collective memories and the more personal postmemories in contributing to a violent relapse of the conflict when new grievances trigger these memories and mobilize support for violence. However, violence is not the inevitable response to transmitted memories of collective victimization, and the chapter discusses how commemorations and community projects can challenge the transmitted collective memories, acknowledge less widely shared collective memories, and contribute to positive intergroup relations between former adversaries.

Item Type: Book Section
Keywords: transgenerational transmission, collective memory, postmemory, Northern Ireland, the Troubles, revenge, reconciliation, commemoration
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > Psychology
Depositing User: Neil Ferguson
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2020 10:28
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2020 10:28
URI: https://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/3144

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