Selling out the revolution for a plate of beans: social eating and violence in Peru's civil conflict of the 1980s and 90s

Evans, Bryce Selling out the revolution for a plate of beans: social eating and violence in Peru's civil conflict of the 1980s and 90s. In: Battlefields and Homefronts: Expanding the Boundaries of Food and Warfare, 1840-1990. University of Arkansas Press. (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

The nation of Perú, at the time of writing home to 33 million people, sits in western South America, at the geographic centre of what was once the territory of the Inca, the largest empire in pre-Columbian America. Following independence in 1821, the modern nation state has undergone development but has also been dogged by conflict, corruption, poverty and social division. Today, across the country, one of the features of the urban landscape are the comedores populares (literally, popular dining rooms): affordable, female-run communal dining spaces announced by the inviting smell of cooking, a community feel, and a friendly noise and bustle. Social eating in Perú is rooted in the much more ancient tradition of indigenous Andean mutuality, but a major underlying factor behind the growth of modern communal dining in Perú was the largescale rural to urban migration of indigenous people, a phenomenon greatly exacerbated by the country’s civil war (c.1980-2000).

Item Type: Book Section
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > History and Politics
Depositing User: Bryce Evans
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2020 13:38
Last Modified: 28 Feb 2020 13:38
URI: https://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/3025

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