‘An opportunistic Anglophobe: Charles J. Haughey, the Irish government and the Falklands War, 1982’, Journal for Contemporary British History, Vol. 30, Issue 2, 2016, pp. tbc.

Kelly, Stephen (2016) ‘An opportunistic Anglophobe: Charles J. Haughey, the Irish government and the Falklands War, 1982’, Journal for Contemporary British History, Vol. 30, Issue 2, 2016, pp. tbc. Journal for Contemporary British History, tbc (tbc). tbc-tbc. ISSN 1361-9462 (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

This article examines Irish taoiseach (prime minister) Charles J. Haughey’s involvement with the Falklands War of 1982; a hitherto neglected subject related to a defining episode in the history of Great Britain in the post-war era. Specifically, it focuses on Haughey’s relationship with British prime minister Margaret Thatcher during the depths of this crisis and the immediate diplomatic and political fallout between the British and Irish governments in the aftermath of the Falklands War. At the heart of this article is the argument that Haughey’s modus operandi during the Falkland War was motivated by a blend of political opportunism and cynical anglophobia. Haughey’s categorical denials, at the time, that he had any knowledge or part to play in the Irish government’s initial decision in April 1982 to support the British government’s sponsored economic and military sanctions against Argentina revealed the opportunistic, indeed cunning, nature of his character.

Item Type: Article
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > History and Politics
Depositing User: Stephen Kelly
Date Deposited: 22 Mar 2016 15:02
Last Modified: 22 Mar 2016 15:02
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/845

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