‘A slave kept in Leyland’s back parlour’: The Male Artist in the Victorian Marketplace

Yeates, Amelia (2015) ‘A slave kept in Leyland’s back parlour’: The Male Artist in the Victorian Marketplace. Visual Culture in Britain, 16.2. pp. 171-185. ISSN 1471-4787 (Print), 1941-8361 (Online)

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Abstract

In the second half of the nineteenth century, artists such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Edward Burne-Jones enjoyed regular patronage from a variety of middle-class patrons, such as William Graham and Frederick Leyland. However, such support came with drawbacks; Burne-Jones complained of being a ‘slave’ to Leyland and Rossetti described his relationship to patrons as that of a ‘whore’. These figurations speak of the dilemma the nineteenth-century male artist faced in the Victorian marketplace, a concern shared by literary artists too, for example Browning in his artist poems. Focusing on self-perceptions by Victorian artists, as well as poetic representations of artists by Victorian writers and didactic commentaries about artists by authors such as Samuel Smiles, this article explores the various tropes used for imagining the male artist in relation to the challenges of the contemporary marketplace. It focuses in particular on concerns about the emasculation of the artist and the gendering of issues such as artistic freedom versus commodification.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Visual Culture in Britain on 2nd June 2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/ 10.1080/14714787.2015.1041814
Keywords: "artist, masculinity, marketplace, prostitute, patrons, commodification, Rossetti, Burne-Jones"
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > Fine and Applied Art
Depositing User: Sioux McGee
Date Deposited: 15 Aug 2017 13:15
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2017 13:15
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/636

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