When coercive control continues to harm children: Post-separation fathering, stalking, and domestic violence

Katz, Emma and Nikupeteri, Anna and Laitinen, Merja (2019) When coercive control continues to harm children: Post-separation fathering, stalking, and domestic violence. Child Abuse Review. ISSN 1099-0852 (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

This article shows how domestic violence perpetrators can use coercive control against their children after their ex-partner has separated from them. Coercive control can include violence, threats, intimidation, stalking, monitoring, emotional abuse and manipulation, interwoven with periods of seemingly ‘caring’ and ‘indulgent’ behaviour as part of the overall abuse. Crucially, what this article provides is knowledge, hitherto largely missing, about how children and young people can experience coercive control post-separation. The article draws on two separate data sets, one from the UK and one from Finland, which together comprise qualitative interviews with 29 children who had coercive control-perpetrating fathers/father-figures. The data sets were separately thematically analysed, then combined using a qualitative interpretative meta-synthesis. This produced three themes regarding children’s experiences: (1) dangerous fathering that made children frightened and unsafe, (2) ‘admirable’ fathering, where fathers/father-figures appeared as ‘caring’, ‘concerned’, ‘indulgent’ and/or ‘vulnerable-victims’, and (3) omnipresent fathering that continually constrained children’s lives. Dangerous and ‘admirable’ fathering describe the behaviours of coercive control-perpetrating fathers/father-figures, while omnipresent fathering occurred in children as a fearful mental and emotional state. Perpetrators could also direct performances of ‘admirable’ fathering at professionals and communities in ways that obscured their coercive control. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Katz, Emma. When coercive control continues to harm children: Post-separation fathering, stalking, and domestic violence. Child Abuse Review: which has been published in final form at . This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > School of Social Science
Depositing User: Emma Katz
Date Deposited: 28 Oct 2019 10:18
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2019 10:18
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/2965

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