Workload and injury in professional soccer players: Role of injury tissue type and injury severity

Enright, K.J. and Malone, James J. and Green, M and Hay, G (2019) Workload and injury in professional soccer players: Role of injury tissue type and injury severity. International Journal of Sports Medicine. ISSN 0172-4622 (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of workload prior to injury on injury (tissue type and severity) in professional soccer players. Twenty-eight days of retrospective training data prior to non-contact injuries (n=264) were collated from 192 professional soccer players. Each injury tissue type (muscle, tendon and ligament) and severity (days missed) were categorised by medical staff. Training data were recorded using global positioning system (GPS) devices for total distance (TD), high speed distance (HSD; >5.5 m/s-1) and sprint distance (SPR; >7.0 m/s-1). Accumulated 1-, 2-, 3-, 4- weekly loads and acute:chronic workload ratios (ACWR) (coupled, uncoupled and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) approaches) were calculated. Workload variables and injury tissue type were compared using a one-way ANOVA. The association between workload variables and injury severity were examined using a bivariate correlation. There were no differences in accumulated weekly loads and ACWR calculations between muscle, ligament and tendon injuries (P > 0.05). Correlations between each workload variable and injury severity highlighted no significant associations (P > 0.05). The present findings suggest that the ability of accumulated weekly workload or ACWR methods to differentiate between injury type and injury severity are limited using the present variables.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: This is the author's version of an article that has been accepted for publication in the International Journal of Sports Medicine. When published, the final version will be available from https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/journal/10.1055/s-00000028
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Dr James Malone
Date Deposited: 31 Jul 2019 15:07
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2019 15:07
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/2921

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