The impact of an accelerated teacher training programme based on a pedagogy of enactment on trainees’ self-efficacy

Liddy, Emma (2018) The impact of an accelerated teacher training programme based on a pedagogy of enactment on trainees’ self-efficacy. Research in Action (3). pp. 10-20. ISSN 2515 9364

[img]
Preview
Text
Liddy, E. The impact of an eccelerated teacher training program.pdf - Published Version

Download (62kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://www.hope.ac.uk/education/researchinthefacu...

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a ‘Pedagogy of Enactment’ approach on trainee teachers’ self-efficacy. Perceived self-efficacy has been defined by Bandura (1997) as, ‘people’s beliefs about their capabilities to produce effects’ (p.7). In the current climate of education and Initial Teacher Training (ITT) there is much discussion about the importance of what it means to be an effective teacher. Selfefficacy, as the belief in one’s own abilities, should therefore be considered an important trait for teacher quality and effectiveness. Self-efficacy scores were collected from Year 1 trainees who had undertaken an accelerated ITT BA QTS Primary Teaching programme at Liverpool Hope University and Year 2 trainees who had experienced a less intensive programme. The scores were compared in order to determine if there was a significant difference between groups and to explore contributing factors. This project was quantitative in nature, using a standardised questionnaire to collect data: Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale (NTSES) (Skaalvik and Skaalvik, 2007, 2010). Initial findings show that Year 1 trainee teachers have higher self-efficacy than trainee teachers in Year 2.

Item Type: Article
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Education > Teacher Education
Depositing User: Philippa Williams
Date Deposited: 15 Apr 2019 12:01
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2019 00:15
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/2813

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item