A qualitative insight into the eating behaviours of adult patients with Type 1 diabetes using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion compared to those using multiple daily injections

Webb, Richard and Davies, I.G. and Purewal, T.S. and Weston, P.J. and Morrison, G. and Abayomi, J.C. (2016) A qualitative insight into the eating behaviours of adult patients with Type 1 diabetes using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion compared to those using multiple daily injections. Diabetic Medicine, 33 (S1). ISSN 0742-3071

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dme.28...

Abstract

Introduction: Multiple daily injections (MDI) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapies alleviate glycaemic excursions in patients with Type 1 diabetes (T1D)1,2. Despite both providing a method of insulin administration there are differences in the mechanisms of delivery and as such CSII offers potential for dietary liberalisation. There is a dearth of qualitative research investigating this which the authors thought prudent to explore. Method: Following ethical approval from the Liverpool Central NRES Ethics Committee (13/NW/0122) adult patients with T1D using either CSII or MDI were recruited from the Royal Liverpool Hospital (n = 22). Following informed consent each patient engaged in a semi-structured interview. Data was audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded into themes which are summarised below. Results: Qualitative data showed patients using MDI felt constrained by the relative inflexibility of their diets. Many reported that the potential loss of glycaemic control was not worth breaking their routine. As a result certain carbohydrate-rich foods became ‘medicalised’, leading to aversions which remained even after patients adopted CSII. The potential for dietary liberalisation offered by CSII was often unknown prior to its commencement and despite encouragement by healthcare professionals patients stated concerns regarding the negative impact this may have upon weight. Conclusions: This data illustrates how the relatively structured diet of patients using MDI was deplored, yet interestingly, the opportunity to relax the diet when using CSII was also viewed with suspicion. This emphasises the need for healthcare professionals to reinforce the benefits of a healthy relationship with food alongside healthy eating.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: Presented at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference. Subsequently published in Diabetic Medicine. Definitive version available from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dme.28_13048
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Richard Webb
Date Deposited: 13 Dec 2018 11:47
Last Modified: 13 Dec 2018 11:47
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/2720

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