Do work characteristics influence quality of life among people with diabetes?

Abubakari, Abdul-Razak and Cousins, Rosanna and Thomas, Cecil and Sharma, Dushyant and Naderali, Ebrahim (2018) Do work characteristics influence quality of life among people with diabetes? Diabetic Medicine, 35 (Sup1). p. 178. ISSN 0742-3071

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Abstract

Aims: It is unclear how work-related characteristics affect quality of life among people with diabetes. We examined the influence of psychosocial work characteristics on quality of life among people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Study packs were posted to addresses of individuals with diabetes who attended two acute trusts in the north-west region of England. Eligible individuals were asked to read a participant information sheet about the study and then sign consent forms prior to participation. Questionnaires were used to collect data on personal characteristics (demographic questionnaire), quality of life (audit of diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire) and participants’ work characteristics (job content questionnaire). Depending on their measurement scale, chi-square test, independent t-test or relevant correlation co-efficient was used to investigate associations between variables. Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS (version 22). The Newcastle & North Tyneside Ethics Committee approved the study. Results: A total of 123 (51%) men and women with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes participated in the study. Over half (53%) of participants were individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Compared to people with Type 1, participants with Type 2 diabetes were more likely to report poor quality of life (p < 0.05). Various work-related characteristics were significantly associated with quality of life. Participants who experienced high psychological job demands were more likely to report poor quality of life compared to those with low demands (mean ± SD = 38.88 ± 6.38 vs 32.34 ± 5.89, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Changes in the type of work and/or adjustments to job characteristics may improve quality of life among working populations with diabetes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: Copyright The Authors, presented at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2018. Available online: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dme.51_13571/epdf
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > Psychology
Depositing User: Rosanna Cousins
Date Deposited: 16 Mar 2018 12:08
Last Modified: 16 Mar 2018 12:08
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/2406

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