Seasonal training load and wellness monitoring in a professional soccer goalkeeper

Malone, James J. and Jaspers, Arne and Helsen, Werner F. and Merks, Brenda and Frencken, Wouter G.P. and Brink, Michel S. (2017) Seasonal training load and wellness monitoring in a professional soccer goalkeeper. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. ISSN 1555-0265 (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to: (a) quantify the training load practices of a professional soccer GK, and (b) investigate the relationship between the training load observed and the subsequent self-reported wellness response. One male goalkeeper playing for a team in the top league of the Netherlands participated in this case study. Training load data were collected across a full season using a global positioning system (GPS) device and session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE). Data was assessed in relation to the number of days to a match (MD- and MD+). In addition, self-reported wellness was assessed using a questionnaire. Duration, total distance, average speed, PlayerLoadTM and load (derived from session-RPE) were highest on MD. The lowest values for duration, total distance and PlayerLoadTM were observed on MD-1 and MD+1. Total wellness scores were highest on MD and MD-3 and were lowest on MD+1 and MD-4. Small to moderate correlations between training load measures (duration, total distance covered, high deceleration efforts and load) and the self-reported wellness scores were found. This exploratory case-study provides novel data about the physical load undertaken by a goalkeeper during one competitive season. The data suggest there are small to moderate relationships between training load indicators and self-reported wellness. This weak relation indicates that the association is not meaningful. This may be due to the lack of position-specific training load parameters we can currently measure in the applied context.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: Accepted author manuscript version reprinted, by permission, from International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 2017, (in press). © Human Kinetics, Inc.
Keywords: Periodization, GPS, RPE, subjective, sport
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: James Malone
Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2017 11:44
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2017 11:44
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/2244

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