'Martin Luther in Modern Philosophy'in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Martin Luther, edited by Derek Nelson and Paul Hinlicky (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017). Online version in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Religion. Oxford University Press, 2014–.

Podmore, Simon D. 'Martin Luther in Modern Philosophy'in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Martin Luther, edited by Derek Nelson and Paul Hinlicky (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017). Online version in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Religion. Oxford University Press, 2014–. In: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Martin Luther. Oxford University Press.

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Official URL: http://religion.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore...

Abstract

Principally, Luther defers from philosophy’s authority to the authority of theology due to an intense recognition of theology’s ultimate foundation in Revelation. Allied to this is a suspicion towards philosophy’s intellectual hubris and speculative neglect of the individual coram Deo (before God)—the ‘God’ who is only known as revealed pro me (for me). As it transpires in modern philosophy’s emergence from its ‘service’ to theology, variations of such concerns come to shape a new philosophical horizon which, for better or ill, come closer to Luther’s own in important and under-examined ways. Under implicit or explicit influence from Luther, key figures in Modern European Philosophy reconfigure critical new modes of philosophy which can be read to reflect Lutheran concerns about the nature of philosophy and reason itself. This story is related through key figures in modern philosophy (Leibniz; Kant; Hegel; Feuerbach; Kierkegaard; Heidegger), leading from the birth and apotheosis of the modern, through to the critical emergence of the postmodern. Through the critical reception of Luther in these philosophers it is shown that modern European philosophy regularly deals with Lutheran tensions but often produces visions of the role of reason and selfhood which would have deeply troubled Luther himself. Nonetheless, there are also signs of a recovery of Luther suspicions about the possibilities of knowing which also bring into question the parameters of post/modern philosophy itself.

Item Type: Book Section
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > Theology, Philosophy and Religion
Depositing User: Simon Podmore
Date Deposited: 19 Apr 2017 15:19
Last Modified: 19 Apr 2017 15:19
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/1915

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