A randomized controlled trial of a group-based gaze training intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

Wood, Greg and Miles, C and Coyles, Ginny and Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid and Vine, Samuel J. and Vickers, JN and Wilson, Mark R. (2017) A randomized controlled trial of a group-based gaze training intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. PLoS ONE, 12 (2). ISSN 1932-6203 (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to integrate a gaze training intervention (i.e., quiet eye training; QET) that has been shown to improve the throwing and catching skill of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), within an approach (i.e., group therapy) that might alleviate the negative psychosocial impact of these motor skill deficits. Twenty-one children with DCD were split into either QET (8 male 3 female, mean age of 8.6 years (SD = 1.04) or technical training (TT) groups (7 male 3 female, mean age of 8.6 years (SD = 1.84). The TT group were given movement-related instructions via video, relating to the throw and catch phases, while the QET group were also taught to fixate a target location on the wall prior to the throw (QE1) and to track the ball prior to the catch (QE2). Each group partook in a 4-week, group therapy intervention and measurements of QE duration and catching performance were taken before and after training, and at a 6-week delayed retention test. Parental feedback on psychosocial and motor skill outcomes was provided at delayed retention. Children improved their gaze control and catching coordination following QET, compared to TT. Mediation analysis showed that a longer QE aiming duration (QE1) predicted an earlier onset of tracking the ball prior to catching (QE2) which predicted catching success. Parents reported enhanced perceptions of their child’s catching ability and general coordination in the QET group compared to the TT group. All parents reported improvements in their child’s confidence, social skills and predilection for physical activity following the trial. The findings offer initial support for an intervention that practitioners could apply to address deficits in the motor and psychosocial skills of children with DCD.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Motor learning; Quiet eye training; Confidence; Catching; Group therapy
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Omid Alizadehkhaiyat
Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2017 14:42
Last Modified: 20 Feb 2017 13:23
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/1847

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