Predicting term-relevance from brain signals (Proceedings of the 37th international ACM SIGIR conference on Research & development in information retrieval)

Eugster, Manuel J.A. and Ruotsalo, Tuukka and Spapé, Michiel M. and Kosunen, Ilkka and Barral, Oswald and Ravaja, Niklas and Jacucci, Giulio and Kaski, Samuel (2014) Predicting term-relevance from brain signals (Proceedings of the 37th international ACM SIGIR conference on Research & development in information retrieval). In: Unspecified. (Accepted for Publication)

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Official URL: http://doi.org/10.1145/2600428.2609594

Abstract

Term-Relevance Prediction from Brain Signals (TRPB) is proposed to automatically detect relevance of text information directly from brain signals. An experiment with forty participants was conducted to record neural activity of participants while providing relevance judgments to text stimuli for a given topic. High-precision scientific equipment was used to quantify neural activity across 32 electroencephalography (EEG) channels. A classifier based on a multi-view EEG feature representation showed improvement up to 17% in relevance prediction based on brain signals alone. Relevance was also associated with brain activity with significant changes in certain brain areas. Consequently, TRPB is based on changes identified in specific brain areas and does not require user-specific training or calibration. Hence, relevance predictions can be conducted for unseen content and unseen participants. As an application of TRPB we demonstrate a high-precision variant of the classifier that constructs sets of relevant terms for a given unknown topic of interest. Our research shows that detecting relevance from brain signals is possible and allows the acquisition of relevance judgments without a need to observe any other user interaction. This suggests that TRPB could be used in combination or as an alternative for conventional implicit feedback signals, such as dwell time or click-through activity.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information and Comments: Full published text available here: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2609594
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > Psychology
Depositing User: Michiel Spape
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2017 10:26
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2017 10:26
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/1697

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