Student-led tutorials and their implications on learning and teaching: Findings from a mixed methods study

Ziniel, Curtis E. and Ghalib, Asad K. (2017) Student-led tutorials and their implications on learning and teaching: Findings from a mixed methods study. SAGE Publishing, London, UK. (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

Student-led tutorials were introduced at the Liverpool Hope Business School after some issues arising in the existing ‘teacher-led’ model. It was felt that these tutorials were becoming just another form of mini-lectures with the lecturers going through tutorial readings in class with minimal student participation and engagement. The new model was designed to engage students. They were awarded marks for attendance and engagement, including submitting a one-page summary of the reading. Twice a year individual students were responsible for presenting the material with the aid of PowerPoint slides and subsequently leading the discussion around the topic. An explanatory sequential mixed-methods design was used to capture student feedback and assess the model’s effectiveness and value for students. The first phase comprised a questionnaire-based survey held over a period of two years. Data obtained was analysed and used to draw up questions for discussion in the second phase, which gathered qualitative data during focus group discussions. Inferences were finally drawn by mixing data from both phases. Study findings revealed that first year students were largely appreciative of the model and stated that the presentations had enabled them to be more confident in standing up and speaking in front of the class. There were mixed responses; however from second year students as they had followed the previous system in which they had got an ‘easy ride’ by just sitting idly in tutorials as they were not being assessed. They did, however, admit in the focus group discussions that their presentation skills and confidence had improved in the new model, where they had to present to the class as well as actively participate in the ensuing discussion.

Item Type: Other
Keywords: mixed methods case study business
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > Business School
Depositing User: Curtis Ziniel
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2016 10:55
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2016 10:55
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/1631

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