"Oh Jesus I Can't Take This", playing witness to the dramatization of Ballymun's urban regeneration project, Dublin (2004-2008)

Malone, Niamh (2014) "Oh Jesus I Can't Take This", playing witness to the dramatization of Ballymun's urban regeneration project, Dublin (2004-2008). BREAC Online Journal, University of Notre Dame. ISSN 2372-2231

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)
Official URL: https://breac.nd.edu/articles/48968-oh-jesus-i-can...

Abstract

Regeneration, as a concept, draws on ideas of rebirth, restoration, and revival. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, the frenzy of urban regeneration projects in the western world is undertaken, according to Saskia Sassen, in direct pursuit of “global city” status, where the signature of the global city arises from global branding by urban regeneration. Two major features of the wave of regeneration projects of that period are the active incorporation of community consultation within flagship cultural projects focused on physical transformation of place, and policies of producing and controlling positive perceptions of planning, process, and outcomes. If Sassen’s argument is valid, then Dublin, Ireland, pursued global city status aggressively from the early 1990s, with a number of large-scale urban regeneration projects—Temple Bar, the Docklands, and Ballymun—transforming the city’s center and its most marginalized suburb. The regeneration of bricks and mortar can be easily planned, measured, and evaluated, but the regeneration of a people’s psyche—a repositioning, perhaps, of an identity—requires a more fully humane approach. It is this human imperative which prompted the integration of the arts into urban regeneration program.

Item Type: Article
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > Drama,Dance and Performance Studies
Depositing User: Niamh Malone
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2016 14:51
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2017 13:20
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/1420

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item