A “Southern interference in the North's affairs”: the prospect of Fianna Fáil as an all-Ireland party, 1926–2011

Kelly, Stephen (2014) A “Southern interference in the North's affairs”: the prospect of Fianna Fáil as an all-Ireland party, 1926–2011. Irish Studies Review, Vol. 2 (Issue). pp. 415-431.

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Dr Stephen Kelly - The prospect of Fianna Fáil as an all-Ireland party - Irish Studies Review - Official submission - Revised - July 2014.docx

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Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0967088...

Abstract

This article demonstrates that Fianna Fáil's efforts in 2007 and thereafter to reconfigure as an all-Ireland party represented a volte-face in policy. From an historical perspective, since Fianna Fáil's establishment in 1926, consecutive leaders from Éamon de Valera to Albert Reynolds in the 1990s consistently refused to remodel the party on an all-Ireland basis. Rather than participating in Northern Ireland mainstream politics, Fianna Fáil was fixated with firstly securing, and then maintaining, a republican government in the south of Ireland. Accordingly, in the words of Lemass speaking in 1964, any “Southern interference in the North's affairs” was habitually ruled out by the Fianna Fáil leadership.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Irish Studies Review on 26/09/2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09670882.2014.955323
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > History and Politics
Depositing User: Stephen Kelly
Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2016 10:57
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2016 16:15
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/515

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