The relationship between CSF tau markers, hippocampal volume and delayed primacy performance in cognitively intact elderly individuals.

Bruno, Davide and Grothe, Michel and Nierenberg, Jay and Teipel, Stefan and Zetterberg, Henrik and Blennow, Kaj and Pomara, Nunzio (2015) The relationship between CSF tau markers, hippocampal volume and delayed primacy performance in cognitively intact elderly individuals. Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring, 1 (1). pp. 81-86. ISSN 2352-8729

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Abstract

"Background Primacy performance in recall has been shown to predict cognitive decline in cognitively intact elderly and conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Delayed primacy performance, but not delayed nonprimacy performance, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume in cognitively intact older individuals. Because presence of neurofibrillary tangles is an early sign of AD-related pathology, we set out to test whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau had an effect on delayed primacy performance, while controlling for hippocampal volume and CSF amyloid-β 1-42 levels. Methods Forty-seven individuals, aged 60 years or older and cognitively intact, underwent a multisession study including lumbar puncture, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head, and memory testing. Results Our regression analyses show that CSF levels of hyperphosphorylated (P) tau are only associated with reduced delayed primacy performance when hippocampal volumes are smaller. Conclusion Our findings suggest that hippocampal size may play a protective role against the negative effects of P tau on memory."

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring, Vol 1, Issue 1, (March 2015), DOI# 10.1016/j.dadm.2014.11.002”
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > Psychology
Depositing User: Philippe Chassy
Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2015 14:40
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2016 00:15
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/446

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