Montreal’s multilingual migrants: Social identities and language attitudes after the proposition of the Quebec Charter of Values

Kircher, Ruth (2016) Montreal’s multilingual migrants: Social identities and language attitudes after the proposition of the Quebec Charter of Values. In: Language, Identity and Migration: Voices from Transnational Speakers and Communities. Peter Lang, Bern, pp. 217-247.

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Abstract

Previous research by the author showed that at the beginning of the 21st century, multilingual migrants in Quebec’s urban centre Montreal shared the same attitudinal trends as the city’s non-migrants – most likely as a result of their shared, civic identity. However, these findings originate from a time at which the provincial government was strongly propagating a civic (rather than an ethnic) national identity. Then, in 2013, the provincial government proposed the Quebec Charter of Values, a bill putting forward the prohibition of religious symbols in the public sector. The Charter caused much controversy and was seen by many migrants as an act of ethnocentrism. In this chapter, Ruth Kircher presents the findings of a new, questionnaire-based study that investigates whether the Charter has caused changes in first- and second-generation immigrants’ social identities and in their attitudes towards French, the province’s official language, compared to English, the primary language of the rest of Canada and North America at large.

Item Type: Book Section
Keywords: identity, language attitudes, language planning, immigration, integration
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > English
Depositing User: Ruth Kircher
Date Deposited: 23 Jun 2016 08:08
Last Modified: 23 Jun 2016 08:08
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/1525

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