Genetic markers in a multi-ethnic sample for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk.

Kennedy, Amy E and Kamdar, Kala Y and Lupo, Philip J and Okcu, M Fatih and Scheurer, Michael E and Dorak, Mehmet Tevfik (2015) Genetic markers in a multi-ethnic sample for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Leukemia & lymphoma, 56 (1). pp. 169-74. ISSN 1029-2403

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Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/1042819...

Abstract

Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple risk loci for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but mostly in European/White populations, despite Hispanics having a greater risk. We re-examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of known associations with childhood ALL and known human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region lymphoma risk markers in a multi-ethnic population. Significant associations were found in two ARID5B variants (rs7089424 and rs10821936). We replicated a strong risk association in non-Hispanic White males with rs2395185, a protective marker for lymphoma. Another HLA region marker, rs2647012, showed a risk association among Hispanics only, while a strong protective association was found with rs1048456, a follicular lymphoma risk marker. Our study validated this new case-control sample by confirming genetic markers associated with childhood ALL, and yielded new associations with lymphoma markers. Despite positive results, our study did not provide any clues as to why Hispanics have a higher susceptibility to childhood leukemia, suggesting that environmental factors may have a strong contribution.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Leukemia and Lymphoma on January 2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.3109/10428194.2014.910662."
Keywords: Genetic epidemiology Genetic associations Cancer susceptibility Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia Genetic predisposition to disease Gender effect
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Mehmet Dorak
Date Deposited: 23 Jun 2016 11:26
Last Modified: 23 Jun 2016 11:26
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/1471

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