The game of trading jobs for emissions

Andreoni, Valeria and Arto, Inaki and Rueda Cantuche, Jose Manuel (2014) The game of trading jobs for emissions. Energy Policy, 66. pp. 517-525. ISSN 0301-4215

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Abstract

Following the debate on the implications of international trade for global climate policy, this paper introduces the topic of the economic benefits from trade obtained by exporting countries in relation to the emissions generated in the production of exports. In 2008, 24% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and 20% of the employment around the world were linked to international trade. China “exported” 30% of emissions and hosted 37.5% of the jobs generated by trade worldwide. The European Union and the United States of America were the destination of 25% and 18.4% of the GHG emissions embodied in trade. The imports of these two regions contributed to the creation of 45% of the employment generated by international trade. This paper proposes the idea of including trade issues in international climate negotiations, taking into account not only the environmental burden generated by developed countries when displacing emissions to developing countries through their imports, but also the economic benefits of developing countries producing the goods exported to developed countries.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information and Comments: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in ENERGY POLICY. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in ENERGY POLICY, ISSUE 66 (March, 2014) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2013.11.046
Keywords: Employment; Greenhouse gas emissions; Multiregional Input–Output model
Faculty / Department: Faculty of Arts & Humanities > Business School
Depositing User: Valeria Andreoni
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2016 08:35
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2016 08:35
URI: http://hira.hope.ac.uk/id/eprint/1271

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